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Security

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Throwing knives and axes is dangerous. All knife thrower pages contain rules for security. Follow these rules! But before the dry matter, first a little poem (only available in german):

ZUM THEMA "SICHERHEIT"

Was? - Axt- und Messerwerfen?
Ja, ob denn die des derfen?
Das ist bestimmt doch sehr gefährlich
Und seien wir doch einmal ehrlich:
Da kann - weiß Gott! - noch was passieren -
Für gar nix würd' ich garantieren!

So spricht der Spießer, schreit dabei
Gleich laut nach uns'rer Polizei.
Wenn was aus Stahl und spitz und scharf,
Steht für ihn fest, dass man's nicht darf.
Für solche blöden Idioten
Gilt bombenfest: Gehört verboten!

Für uns jedoch steht jederzeit
Im Vordergrund die Sicherheit.
Wir lassen zwar die Klingen fliegen,
Doch immer die Vernunft obsiegen.
Und dafür garantieren stets
Die Eurothrowers - Flying Blades!

Dieter Führer (Februar 2005)

This is a creative and experimental website. We also cover topics, that are not established. This is why we treat security especially painstackingly, and try to classify different categories of dangers.

Logo of subchapter (1)   General safety rules for knife throwing
The rules for classical knife throwing cover the safety of the environment from the dangerous ricochets.
Logo of subchapter (2)   Rules for heavy devices
With increasing weight comes the danger of smashing.
Logo of subchapter (3)   Rules for sharp devices
With sharpness of the device comes the danger of cutting.
Logo of subchapter (4)   Rules for axes
The axe is a combination of knife and hammer, means sharp plus heavy. From the combination of sharpness plus weight comes the danger of splitting.
Logo of subchapter (5)   Rules for skyth and chain saw
By the activity of the devices comes the danger of biting. It makes not much sense to throw a chain saw onto a target. But for juggling, there are options.
Logo of subchapter (6)   Rules for knife catching (juggling)
Normally, you will escape a flying knife, not catch it. But if it's itching in your fingers, you can at least think about.
Logo of subchapter (7)   Rules by law
You must accept the weapon law in your country. That goes with throwing knifes mostly all right.

 

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(1)   Safety rules for knife throwing in general

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Safety rules for knife throwing cover the safety of the environment from the dangerous ricochets.

Never give a throw a chance to reach a person!

We did not invent something new here, but learned it from already established knife throwers websites. You find such rules on each knife throwers website.

These rules can everybody follow. It has nothing to do with your actual skills. They are designed that you can practice in safety, without having manual skills.

Throwing knives is more dangerous, than you may think! The device may reflect back in surprising and far ways, zigzag eventually. Even if only one of thousands throws!

These rules are meant for throwing knifes, which are not sharp and not heavy, but only pointed. So the danger of cutting and of smashing is neglected.

 

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(2)   Safety Rules for Heavy Devices

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With increasing weight comes the danger of smashing.

We are over-exact. But by telling each aspect separately, later, in the axe chapter, it will be easier to understand its combined attributes.

What a hammer hits, it smashes.

Here some of the most important rules for working with heavy devices:

The hammer is not dangerous when touching in rest, only when moving and hitting. . Though it is entirely dull, it smashes the target.

Instructions for handling heavy devices you may find e.g. in workshops with heavy tools or in halls with cranes.

 

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(3)   Safety Rules for Sharp devices

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With sharpness of the device comes the danger of cutting. Only to hold a sharp knife in hand already needs to be learned!

What a sharp edge touches, it cuts.

A loose collection of rules:

 

What is meant by "sharp"? Think of a shaving blade.

Sharp knifes need attentive and composed handling.

Literatur on the sharpness of shaving blades you can find . . . or chapter "Introduction - Metallurgy" . . .

 

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(4)   Safety Rules for Axes

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The axe is a combination of knife and hammer, means sharp plus heavy. From the combination of sharpness plus weight comes the danger of splitting.

What an axe hits, that it splits.

The weight of an hammer combined with the edge of knife (even if dull) makes the axe a most effective device.

To measure the danger of an axe, do not add the danger of knife and hammer, but multiply them!

When in movement, the axe is a dangerous thing.

 

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(5)   Safety Rules for Catching

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Normally, you will escape a flying knife, not catch it. But if it's itching in your fingers, you can at least think about.

If you see somebody catching a knife out of the air, resist and do not just simulate this. Except you know very well, what you do.

Do catch a sharp device only then, if you are able to watch and control the ongoing in slow motion!

It makes a great difference how sharp the thing is.

This slow motion staff is no joke! We mean exactly this! This is a distinctive sensation. Depending on daytime and situation, you have it or not.

A whole new class of considerations come into play!

How does this look like? To have an idea of the ongoings during a catch read the description of the chatch in chapter "Technique - From grip to throw - Step Three".

Though I can clearly feel the slow motion, I could not yet find out the neurological details of the phenomenon. It has to do with exercising! The repeated exercising enables something, the software developers know as compression algorithms. Similar mechanisms might be at work during the Follow Through (chapter "Technique - Follow Through").

 

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(6)   Safety Rules for Chain Saws

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It makes not much sense to throw a chain saw onto a target. But for juggling, there are options.

This device is sharp plus heavy plus active. It develops movement on its own! With activity comes the danger of biting.

What comes into reach, the chainsaw bites into.

Make sure that you master the normal rules for chain saw. This you can find in the manual to your device. More recommended is a introduction by a teacher.

The point of attention is, that the device must not fall to the ground. Letting fall down is not save here, because the device is active! Make sure the escape way backward.

The ergonomic complication are the unsymmetrical grips with the protectors around. They have no freedom. You must actively slip into them.

Please continue reading in "Appendix (A) Throwing Devices - Chain Saw" and "Appendix (A) Throwing Devices - Scyth".

 

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(7)   Security by the Laws

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You must accept the weapon law in your country. That goes with throwing knifes mostly all right.

Take notice of the laws of your country.

Short summary of the german law:

You may call throwing knifes sport devices. Therefore you may own and use them. But you must not carry them at a collection of people. Because then they are dangerous objects.

Bingo.

Beware - perhaps not bingo! Above description sorrily now is history! Since October, 1st of 2003, Germany got a new weapon lay, which classifies quite some of our toys as "forbidden devices"! E.g. throwing stars or butterfly knives are not allowed in Germany, no matter which size.

Each european country has freedom in some aspects, but restriction in some other aspects. Each contry has it's freedom and restrictions distributed differently. That's a situation, most of us can live with fine. The development but now is, to unite those diverse laws to one common. This is fine. But not fine will be, if the laws always merge only on the lowest level! What will be left are all the restrictions, and no freedom. And this will be bad. Think about!

Detailed information about the laws in Europe are in preparation.

 

Always watch the safety!

 


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